1972 Paperback and eBook Subscription

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1972 Paperback and eBook Subscription

50.00

For our first year of recreating The Eden Book we are starting with 1972, a year of original and exciting horror for the society. This subscription will give you the full six titles published that year. Starting in April 2018 we will send you the novella published that month in both the paperback and eBook format. If you join after April we'll send you all of the books we have published up until that point.

We'll also add your email to The Archivist's Newsletter so that you get our monthly updates of materials found in the family archives. 

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The 1972 books are..

Holt House

L. G. Vey

It's a quiet house, sheltered, standing in a mass of tangled old trees called the Holtwood. Raymond watches it. He's been watching it, through a gap in the fence at the bottom of the garden, for weeks. Thinking about the elderly owners, Mr and Mrs Latch, who took him in one night when he was a frightened boy caught up in an emergency. Mr Latch showed him something that was kept in a wardrobe in the spare room. He can't remember what it was. He only knows how sick it made him feel. Raymond watches Holt House. He has to remember what he saw. He has to get inside.

A Dedicated Friend

Shirley Longford

Organ donation is in its infancy and Daisy Howard, who is giving a kidney to her aunt, is in the hands of a pioneering surgeon. After the operation, Daisy is desperate to get back to her family, yet the days go by and she remains in the hospital; meanwhile, an old friend keeps visiting with news of home, and Daisy becomes increasingly uneasy.

Judderman

D.A. Northwood

London, early-1970s. In a city plagued by football violence, Republican bombings, blackouts and virulent racism, a new urban myth is taking hold. Among the broken down estates, crumbling squats and failed projects of a dying metropolis, whispered sightings of a malevolent figure nicknamed the Judderman are spreading. A manifestation of the sick psyche of a city, or something else?

Plunge Hill: A Case Study

J.M. McVulpin

Dear Maurice, I’m writing to you by candlelight again. Another power cut. I had to carry the papers back and forth in the dark, tiny flames flickering in the stairwells… They’ve got the petrol generators running in Ward 7 and the noise they make is like a swarm of bees has got into the place…

 

In 1972, during the chaotic days of miners’ strikes and the three-day week, Bridget ‘Brix’ Shipley moves to Plunge Hill to start her new job as a medical secretary at the local hospital. As she writes to Maurice, her younger brother, sick at home (who never replies), it becomes clear that not all is well at Plunge Hill. There are frequent power cuts and she has to work by candlelight. While she’d hoped this might inspire some blitz spirit and solidarity between her, the other secretaries and the medical staff, she’s increasingly isolated and seemingly ignored by her co-workers.

 

The Castle

Chuck Valentine

Jon’s dad was something of a pioneer in 1972, after writing a new kind of book – a book where readers could make their own choices and choose their own way through the story. Unfortunately, the idea was ahead of its time and his father died of a heart attack without ever finding the success he deserved.

It’s the summer and, between signing on to the unemployment allowance, Jon's moved back to his hometown to help his mum cope with her grief. Contending with his own grief, he loses himself in his father’s unpublished manuscripts. Fiction and reality blend perhaps a little too closely, and when he discovers a hidden appendix he finds that his father’s imagination was more terrifying and more powerful than he could have imagined.

Starve Acre

Jonathan Buckley

Richard and Juliette Willoughby live in an old farmhouse somewhere in North Yorkshire. The place has been called Starve Acre since anyone can remember and there is a local story about there being ‘something’ buried in the field. A 'something' which prevents anything from growing there. Quite what it is varies from one person to the next – a witch, or some tool once used by a witch, or the rope used to hang a witch – but there is general agreement in the area that it is a place to be avoided. In fact, the locals blame Starve Acre for Juliette’s illness, a degenerative mental condition that has transformed her into a vacant, ghost-like shell of her former self.